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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. while egyptians are raising their voices two years after rising up against hosni mubarak, in syria, the defiance has not shifted president assad. homs has seen some of the worst fighting. our reporter has returned for this special report. >> some of the heaviest fighting happened here. this neighborhood came to symbolize a brutal conflict. a ferocious government offensive after the opposition, it was an assault on an entire community. after nearly one year, life is slowly returning. rubbish collectors are on the job. a small sign the government is back on the street. some families are starting to come home. how is life here, i asked. could not be better, he replied. he gives an anxious look at the soldiers escorting us. a repair shop is back in business. it is not much of a bicycle, but he makes it work. it is what life is like here. >> services are very good. before, life was more difficult. things are getting better day by day. >> it is still a fragile calm, but good enough for children to play on the street. even they do not take notice when guns go off in the distance. it is pa
in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to do that. >> thank you very much. while
the ministry. >> two years ago, the protests in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to
intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian president, hosni mubarak. tanks and armored vehicles, and snipers all over the place. hundreds of egyptian protesters killed. and then it was over. the arab spring had come to egypt. those were days of high optimism. i was in egypt with secretary of state hillary clinton a few weeks after the revolution. we walked around tahrir square with little security. egyptians were thrilled to see her. i remember the near euphoria when she went to the nearby u.s. ambassador to thank the american diplomats for all their hard work during those difficult days. >> madam secretary, what do you think about tahrir square? >> well, it was very exciting and moving for me to go to tahrir square and have some sense of what those amazing days must have been like here in cairo. and i am so looking forward to helping in any way that we can, in this transformation, and all the work that needs to be done. >> reporter: that was then, this is egypt now, huge concrete blocks surround all the entrances to the u.s. embassy. that reads free egypt, free palesti
been controversy that we are sending f-16s over a deal made with then-president hosni mubarak in 2010. is that our best move? >> this is confusing in a lot of ways from what the president's agenda. what is the president's goal in the middle-east? what is the president's goal throughout the world with the fight on terrorism? i think there are so many mixed messages that it's hard to understand what is the strategy here? how are we going to control terrorism whether it's in afghanistan or the middle-east or in iran? so to be sending f-16s into the middle-east at this time, again sends a message, are we going to lead or lead from behind. >> congresswoman, if we cut off aid to egypt at this point, we are going on cut off an important rale relationship? >> this is not just about aid. this is about some very sophisticated military weapon systems in the hands a government at this particular point that we are not really sure how effective they are going to be. i mean... part of it is the congress's fault. it is not just the president, you know, following through on what was in place for egypt
of president hosni mubarak. jeffrey brown has our story. >> brown: political violence ravaged egypt for a fifth day after a weekend that saw more than 50 people killed. in cairo, protestors threw rocks and gasoline bombs at riot police. police in turn fired tear gas into the crowds who oppose president mohammed morsi and his islamist dominated government. >> what's happening here in the country is really shameful. destroying the city is not fair. but at the same time the way the police treat people makes tensions heavier because all decisions by morsi's government have been taken out of the public interest. >> brown: security officials said a man described as a by-stander was killed by a gunshot. it was unclear who fired it. and government tanks were on the streets in the cities of suez and port said. they enforced a curfew that an angry president morsi announced last night. >> to end the bloodshed, to maintain security against vandals and law breakers and for the protection of citizens, i have decided after referring to the constitution to announce the imposing of the state of emergency in por
of the american taxpayer. the deal that was signed when former egyptian president hosni mubarak was in charge. joins us is vice chief of staff . along with the senior fellow of the hoover institute. general, it is no secret that egypt president mursey is a long time member of the muslim brotherhood and waged a power grab. it was done when we knew we had a strong ally in mubarak. >> we have leverage with a billion in aid and continues to arm and train the emanagement. morsi wants the deal that mubarak. he would support the foreign policy the peace treaty and help with the radicals and in return, we have hands off of domestic politics and concerns about political and social injustice and lack of economic opportunity for his people while we continue that aid. that simes to be the path we are on now with morsi . i believe if we continue the aide, it would be condition based so that we have a say about the things that morsi is doing and the actions that he's taken. >> some believe that morsi's regime distanced itself from washington and morsi who is it the first egyptian leader to visit iran since
. this was a country united behind one goal, to topple the dictator hosni mubarak but two years on this country is divided, polarized and for the first time many people here fear the violence is actually threatening the country's very stability. the chaotic moments when anger turned deadly. outside the city's jail, dozens were killed as protesters tried to storm it to free prisoners who minutes earlier were sentenced to death in cairo. 21 defendants were convicted for their part in a soccer stadium massacre that killed more than 70 fans one year ago. the verdict was read and relatives of those killed last year showed grief and joy. for them the ruling was just. an investigation concluded last year's deadly rampage was not a spontaneous outburst of crowd violence. many believed it was a conspiracy to kill supporters of a popular soccer team whose fans have been at the forefront of egypt's revolution. a revolution that marked its second anniversary yesterday with deadly clashes in cairo and other cities, a scene quite different than two years ago. under pressure, the government deployed the milit
hosni mubarak was forced from power and now people seem to, some of them anyway, want to see another overthrow happen on the streets of egypt. conor powell is following all of these developments for us. good morning, conor. >> reporter: well, martha, it has been six days of growing protests and violent riots. now the anger on the street really stems from the slow pace of political and economic reform. on sunday night the current president, mohammed morsi, declared martial law in three cities, including suez, the major shipping hub. he defended the emergency law calling it necessarily but it is eerily similar to the ones imposed on egyptians for the three decade long rule of angelo mozilo, -- hosni mubarak, former strong man. they were taking to the streets protesting against the moresy government. egyptians say morsi is becoming another hosni mubarak with islamic face. martha, morsi offered a hand to the opposition to engage in dialogue. that offer was quickly rejected. martha: how is the military responding to all of this, conor? >> reporter: the top general, top military commander
. >> the second anniversary of the revolution that ousted hosni mubarak. they say morrissey has betrayed the revolution, and dozens were injured. some hospitalized. nbc's amman joins me from cairo. let's talk about the protests, pro and conmorsi today. what is the overall feeling about president morsi two years in? >> if we had to measure it by the show of force or the protesters that are out today, you would say that on the second anniversary, his popularity among those on the streets, is very low. in fact, you know, andrea, we're standing several hundred feet among one of the streets near the division building here, and the tear gas that is being used is so strong we can feel it here in our office. these clashes have been by protesters who say that president morsi and the muslim brotherhood are taking over egypt and betraying the aspirations of a revolution they foot for two years ago. now, no doubt, president morsi and the muslim brotherhood enjoy support and popularity. they are not on the streets today. that is because the muslim brotherhood has ordered their supporters and their fo
this goes against the revolution that toppled former president hosni mubarak. so they're unhappy and demanding a change from president morsi. >> lama, we heard that emergency law was ordered in three provinces in egypt. has that been enforced? >> exactly. despite this emergency law that was announced in the three provinces, the protesters defiantly took to the streets overnight and what sparked the violence over the weekend, particularly in port saed, was a verdict that sentenced 21 die-hard soccer fans to death for storming the field and attacking a rival team resulting in a blood bath. this took place last february. within minutes of the verdict, family members went on a rampage attacking police stations and government buildings. police fired back, killing at least 32 people and injuring hundreds. the army moved in to try to seize control. of course, egypt's cabinet has given the army more powers now, especially the power of arrest. but it is clear from the protesters that the fact that they defied this emergency law is a clear message to the president that they're not going an
weapons to fight wars? this was an old deal signed in 2010 under the hosni mubarak regime, but we are fulfilling our deal any way even though obviously morsi's relationship with us is much more dubious. >>brian: here is rudy giuliani yesterday with sean hannity. >> explain to me where egypt is threatened. egypt is not threatened by saudi arabia, not threatened by iran, not threatened by russia, klein, the united states. what conceivable reason would they have for these jets other than to do something to protect themselves theoretically against israel or to help iran in some kind of action against israel. >> we're going to give lethal weapons to someone who believes that the people in israel are descendants of apes and pigs. >>brian: these f-16's aren't knockoffs. they are the cutting edge f-16's that our own pilots use full of everything that we would get here in the u.s. >>steve: that particular jet was just taking off from fort worth yesterday bound for egypt. keep in mind the billions of dollars that we give egypt in foreign aid each year, we wind up essentially accounting for
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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